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Cristo Rey Church
In the late 1930's the eastside of Santa fe did not have a church. Canyon Road was getting wider and there were about 283 families populating the alfalfa and corn fields up the valley to the mountains. On Sundays, there would be a procession of people walking down the paths to go to the Cathedral for mass, only to be relinquished to the back of the church, due to social and economic status. This situation got very old for the folks on the eastside and they decided to build their own church. Some of residents were related to officials in the city and state government and that set the tone for their actions. The Rodriguez, Sena and Catanach families donated some land for the purpose of building their own church, a church that would reflect the indigenous people not some structure from France. The pressure was on. They started to make their requests but did not get the answers they wanted. The archdiocese in Albuquerque was headed by the archbishop R. A. Gerkin. For almost two years, the answer was no. Finally, the archbishop after being pressured by every politician in northern New Mexico, gave permission for a small church to be built and he asked for a architect. John Gaw Meem was acquired, who was the designer of the La Fonda Hotel. A contractor from Albuquerque was hired on to oversee the project to satisfy the archbishop's concerns about the project. Everything was well until another request was made. The people in the eastside asked for more. They wanted to be the ones to build their church. So, The archbishop granted them his permission. Another request came about from the parish, (the archbishop was getting very tired of their requests by now), they wanted a reredos that was in storage in the back of the Cathedral. The archbishop was tired by this time and he said yes, fine, go ahead. He did not realize the size of the reredos or alter screen would constitute the size of the church. The reredos was carved in 1760 by unknown Mexican artisans for Governor Francisco Marin del Valle. The stone was quarried northeast of Santa Fe and was made for the military chapel on the plaza for the governor. This reredos was 20ft by 40 ft tall. After Archbishop Lamy built the Cathedral, the reredos was put in storage, collecting dust in crates, since 1888 . The new contractor was less then knowledgeable and insensitive to the workers, he hired them and their first task was making adobes. He questioned them about the straw. They all stopped. He did not know about adding straw to the adobes, they exclaimed, "Its like a man without a soul!" This proved he had a lot to learn from the men. With 100 men to do the work 150,000 to 180,000 adobes were made in the hot summer sun, and it only took 12 to 14 months to complete the church. The vigas were brought from the mountains in the east and peeled on site. They average weight of each viga is 2000 lbs. The corbels were made on site and all the wooden pews and confessionals were made by the boys at the diocesan Lourdes Trades School in Albuquerque. The church, on its longest side, measures 350 ft. Which make this church, the largest, single construction, adobe structure in the southwest. The walls vary from 2ft. to 9ft. thick in some areas. Finally, the archbishop drove up the six hour drive from Albuquerque to visit the job site and was astonished at the size and magnitude of the project. He was shocked and infuriated, then he was overcome with the beauty of the church and could not keep himself from falling in love with the creation. This church is the hidden treasure of Santa Fe, not only because of its pueblo beauty, but because of the story behind its building. A story of the love and dedication of the men and women of its parish who wanted their own church to worship in. The first mass was on June 27, 1940, 14 months after the first adobe was made. The Archbishop said the mass, celebrating the 400th anniversary of the Spanish entry into New Mexico.
1120 Canyon Road
Santa Fe, NM 87505
505-983-8528
In the late 1930's the eastside of Santa fe did not have a church. Canyon Road was getting wider and there were about 283 families populating the alfalfa and corn fields up the valley to the mountains. On Sundays, there would be a procession of people walking down the paths to go to the Cathedral for mass, only to be relinquished to the back of the church, due to social and economic status. This situation got very old for the folks on the eastside and they decided to build their own church. Some of residents were related to officials in the city and state government and that set the tone for their actions. The Rodriguez, Sena and Catanach families donated some land for the purpose of building their own church, a church that would reflect the indigenous people not some structure from France. The pressure was on. They started to make their requests but did not get the answers they wanted. The archdiocese in Albuquerque was headed by the archbishop R. A. Gerkin. For almost two years, the answer was no. Finally, the archbishop after being pressured by every politician in northern New Mexico, gave permission for a small church to be built and he asked for a architect. John Gaw Meem was acquired, who was the designer of the La Fonda Hotel. A contractor from Albuquerque was hired on to oversee the project to satisfy the archbishop's concerns about the project. Everything was well until another request was made. The people in the eastside asked for more. They wanted to be the ones to build their church. So, The archbishop granted them his permission. Another request came about from the parish, (the archbishop was getting very tired of their requests by now), they wanted a reredos that was in storage in the back of the Cathedral. The archbishop was tired by this time and he said yes, fine, go ahead. He did not realize the size of the reredos or alter screen would constitute the size of the church. The reredos was carved in 1760 by unknown Mexican artisans for Governor Francisco Marin del Valle. The stone was quarried northeast of Santa Fe and was made for the military chapel on the plaza for the governor. This reredos was 20ft by 40 ft tall. After Archbishop Lamy built the Cathedral, the reredos was put in storage, collecting dust in crates, since 1888 . The new contractor was less then knowledgeable and insensitive to the workers, he hired them and their first task was making adobes. He questioned them about the straw. They all stopped. He did not know about adding straw to the adobes, they exclaimed, "Its like a man without a soul!" This proved he had a lot to learn from the men. With 100 men to do the work 150,000 to 180,000 adobes were made in the hot summer sun, and it only took 12 to 14 months to complete the church. The vigas were brought from the mountains in the east and peeled on site. They average weight of each viga is 2000 lbs. The corbels were made on site and all the wooden pews and confessionals were made by the boys at the diocesan Lourdes Trades School in Albuquerque. The church, on its longest side, measures 350 ft. Which make this church, the largest, single construction, adobe structure in the southwest. The walls vary from 2ft. to 9ft. thick in some areas. Finally, the archbishop drove up the six hour drive from Albuquerque to visit the job site and was astonished at the size and magnitude of the project. He was shocked and infuriated, then he was overcome with the beauty of the church and could not keep himself from falling in love with the creation. This church is the hidden treasure of Santa Fe, not only because of its pueblo beauty, but because of the story behind its building. A story of the love and dedication of the men and women of its parish who wanted their own church to worship in. The first mass was on June 27, 1940, 14 months after the first adobe was made. The Archbishop said the mass, celebrating the 400th anniversary of the Spanish entry into New Mexico.
Palace of the Governors at the New Mexico History Museum
As of August 1, 2018 Palace of the Governors is closed for 6 months for ongoing renovation and will reopen in Spring 2019. To firmly ground yourself in New Mexico's rich past, visit this museum on the Santa Fe Plaza. Built by the Spanish as a government building in 1610, the Palace remains the country's oldest continuously occupied public building. Its exhibits chronicle the history of Santa Fe as well as New Mexico and the region. American Indian artists sell their wares under its historic portal as part of the Native American Artisans Program. The Palace shares a campus (and admission!) with the New Mexico Museum of History, the Palace Press, the Fray Angelico Chavez History Library and Palace of the Governors Photo Archives.
105 W. Palace Ave.
Santa Fe, NM 87501
(505) 476-5200
As of August 1, 2018 Palace of the Governors is closed for 6 months for ongoing renovation and will reopen in Spring 2019. To firmly ground yourself in New Mexico's rich past, visit this museum on the Santa Fe Plaza. Built by the Spanish as a government building in 1610, the Palace remains the country's oldest continuously occupied public building. Its exhibits chronicle the history of Santa Fe as well as New Mexico and the region. American Indian artists sell their wares under its historic portal as part of the Native American Artisans Program. The Palace shares a campus (and admission!) with the New Mexico Museum of History, the Palace Press, the Fray Angelico Chavez History Library and Palace of the Governors Photo Archives.
New Mexico State Capitol Building
The New Mexico State Capitol (a.k.a. the Roundhouse), located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, is the seat of government of the U.S. state of New Mexico. It is unique as the only round state capitol in the United States.
The building was designed to resemble the Zia Sun Symbol when viewed from above, with four entrance wings that protrude from the main cylindrical volume. Architecturally, the Capitol is a blend of New Mexico territorial style and neoclassical influences. Above each entrance is a stone carving of the State Seal of New Mexico. The building has four levels, one of which is below ground.
Dedicated on December 8, 1966, the building was designed by W.C. Kruger and constructed by Robert E. McKee.
411 State Capitol
Santa Fe, NM 87501
505-986-4589
The New Mexico State Capitol (a.k.a. the Roundhouse), located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, is the seat of government of the U.S. state of New Mexico. It is unique as the only round state capitol in the United States.
The building was designed to resemble the Zia Sun Symbol when viewed from above, with four entrance wings that protrude from the main cylindrical volume. Architecturally, the Capitol is a blend of New Mexico territorial style and neoclassical influences. Above each entrance is a stone carving of the State Seal of New Mexico. The building has four levels, one of which is below ground.
Dedicated on December 8, 1966, the building was designed by W.C. Kruger and constructed by Robert E. McKee.
The U.S. Courthouse had its beginnings as the proposed territorial capitol for New Mexico. In 1848 under the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Mexico ceded what is now New Mexico, Arizona, California, Texas, and portions of Colorado, Utah and Nevada, to the United States. The New Mexico territorial government was established two years later. In 1851 Congress appropriated $20,000 and in 1854 an additional $50,000 to construct a "state house" on what is now Federal Plaza.
South Federal Place and Lincoln Avenue Santa Fe, NM 87501

1 (505) 988-6481
The U.S. Courthouse had its beginnings as the proposed territorial capitol for New Mexico. In 1848 under the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Mexico ceded what is now New Mexico, Arizona, California, Texas, and portions of Colorado, Utah and Nevada, to the United States. The New Mexico territorial government was established two years later. In 1851 Congress appropriated $20,000 and in 1854 an additional $50,000 to construct a "state house" on what is now Federal Plaza.


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New Mexico State Capitol

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