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Visiting Santa Fe

Religious

There are 7 Listings
Cristo Rey Church
In the late 1930's the eastside of Santa fe did not have a church. Canyon Road was getting wider and there were about 283 families populating the alfalfa and corn fields up the valley to the mountains. On Sundays, there would be a procession of people walking down the paths to go to the Cathedral for mass, only to be relinquished to the back of the church, due to social and economic status. This situation got very old for the folks on the eastside and they decided to build their own church. Some of residents were related to officials in the city and state government and that set the tone for their actions. The Rodriguez, Sena and Catanach families donated some land for the purpose of building their own church, a church that would reflect the indigenous people not some structure from France. The pressure was on. They started to make their requests but did not get the answers they wanted. The archdiocese in Albuquerque was headed by the archbishop R. A. Gerkin. For almost two years, the answer was no. Finally, the archbishop after being pressured by every politician in northern New Mexico, gave permission for a small church to be built and he asked for a architect. John Gaw Meem was acquired, who was the designer of the La Fonda Hotel. A contractor from Albuquerque was hired on to oversee the project to satisfy the archbishop's concerns about the project. Everything was well until another request was made. The people in the eastside asked for more. They wanted to be the ones to build their church. So, The archbishop granted them his permission. Another request came about from the parish, (the archbishop was getting very tired of their requests by now), they wanted a reredos that was in storage in the back of the Cathedral. The archbishop was tired by this time and he said yes, fine, go ahead. He did not realize the size of the reredos or alter screen would constitute the size of the church. The reredos was carved in 1760 by unknown Mexican artisans for Governor Francisco Marin del Valle. The stone was quarried northeast of Santa Fe and was made for the military chapel on the plaza for the governor. This reredos was 20ft by 40 ft tall. After Archbishop Lamy built the Cathedral, the reredos was put in storage, collecting dust in crates, since 1888 . The new contractor was less then knowledgeable and insensitive to the workers, he hired them and their first task was making adobes. He questioned them about the straw. They all stopped. He did not know about adding straw to the adobes, they exclaimed, "Its like a man without a soul!" This proved he had a lot to learn from the men. With 100 men to do the work 150,000 to 180,000 adobes were made in the hot summer sun, and it only took 12 to 14 months to complete the church. The vigas were brought from the mountains in the east and peeled on site. They average weight of each viga is 2000 lbs. The corbels were made on site and all the wooden pews and confessionals were made by the boys at the diocesan Lourdes Trades School in Albuquerque. The church, on its longest side, measures 350 ft. Which make this church, the largest, single construction, adobe structure in the southwest. The walls vary from 2ft. to 9ft. thick in some areas. Finally, the archbishop drove up the six hour drive from Albuquerque to visit the job site and was astonished at the size and magnitude of the project. He was shocked and infuriated, then he was overcome with the beauty of the church and could not keep himself from falling in love with the creation. This church is the hidden treasure of Santa Fe, not only because of its pueblo beauty, but because of the story behind its building. A story of the love and dedication of the men and women of its parish who wanted their own church to worship in. The first mass was on June 27, 1940, 14 months after the first adobe was made. The Archbishop said the mass, celebrating the 400th anniversary of the Spanish entry into New Mexico.
1120 Canyon Road
Santa Fe, NM 87505
505-983-8528
In the late 1930's the eastside of Santa fe did not have a church. Canyon Road was getting wider and there were about 283 families populating the alfalfa and corn fields up the valley to the mountains. On Sundays, there would be a procession of people walking down the paths to go to the Cathedral for mass, only to be relinquished to the back of the church, due to social and economic status. This situation got very old for the folks on the eastside and they decided to build their own church. Some of residents were related to officials in the city and state government and that set the tone for their actions. The Rodriguez, Sena and Catanach families donated some land for the purpose of building their own church, a church that would reflect the indigenous people not some structure from France. The pressure was on. They started to make their requests but did not get the answers they wanted. The archdiocese in Albuquerque was headed by the archbishop R. A. Gerkin. For almost two years, the answer was no. Finally, the archbishop after being pressured by every politician in northern New Mexico, gave permission for a small church to be built and he asked for a architect. John Gaw Meem was acquired, who was the designer of the La Fonda Hotel. A contractor from Albuquerque was hired on to oversee the project to satisfy the archbishop's concerns about the project. Everything was well until another request was made. The people in the eastside asked for more. They wanted to be the ones to build their church. So, The archbishop granted them his permission. Another request came about from the parish, (the archbishop was getting very tired of their requests by now), they wanted a reredos that was in storage in the back of the Cathedral. The archbishop was tired by this time and he said yes, fine, go ahead. He did not realize the size of the reredos or alter screen would constitute the size of the church. The reredos was carved in 1760 by unknown Mexican artisans for Governor Francisco Marin del Valle. The stone was quarried northeast of Santa Fe and was made for the military chapel on the plaza for the governor. This reredos was 20ft by 40 ft tall. After Archbishop Lamy built the Cathedral, the reredos was put in storage, collecting dust in crates, since 1888 . The new contractor was less then knowledgeable and insensitive to the workers, he hired them and their first task was making adobes. He questioned them about the straw. They all stopped. He did not know about adding straw to the adobes, they exclaimed, "Its like a man without a soul!" This proved he had a lot to learn from the men. With 100 men to do the work 150,000 to 180,000 adobes were made in the hot summer sun, and it only took 12 to 14 months to complete the church. The vigas were brought from the mountains in the east and peeled on site. They average weight of each viga is 2000 lbs. The corbels were made on site and all the wooden pews and confessionals were made by the boys at the diocesan Lourdes Trades School in Albuquerque. The church, on its longest side, measures 350 ft. Which make this church, the largest, single construction, adobe structure in the southwest. The walls vary from 2ft. to 9ft. thick in some areas. Finally, the archbishop drove up the six hour drive from Albuquerque to visit the job site and was astonished at the size and magnitude of the project. He was shocked and infuriated, then he was overcome with the beauty of the church and could not keep himself from falling in love with the creation. This church is the hidden treasure of Santa Fe, not only because of its pueblo beauty, but because of the story behind its building. A story of the love and dedication of the men and women of its parish who wanted their own church to worship in. The first mass was on June 27, 1940, 14 months after the first adobe was made. The Archbishop said the mass, celebrating the 400th anniversary of the Spanish entry into New Mexico.
Cathedral Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi
The crowning achievement of Archbishop Lamy's church construction in New Mexico, the Saint Francis Cathedral was built between 1869 and 1886 and designed in the French Romanesque Revival style. Although its design contrasts the surrounding adobe buildings, the cathedral remains one of Santa Fe's most celebrated landmarks.
131 Cathedral Place
Santa Fe, NM 87501
(505) 982-5619
The crowning achievement of Archbishop Lamy's church construction in New Mexico, the Saint Francis Cathedral was built between 1869 and 1886 and designed in the French Romanesque Revival style. Although its design contrasts the surrounding adobe buildings, the cathedral remains one of Santa Fe's most celebrated landmarks.
Congregation Beit Tikva
Congregation Beit Tikva is a spiritual harmonious congregation sharing Jewish values in the reform tradition. We teach and practice Judaism seeking joy and commitment through education, mitzvot, tzedakah and ahavat yisrael. We are respectful of diverse opinions and are welcoming to all.
2230 Old Pecos Trail Santa Fe, NM
Santa Fe, NM 87502
505 820-2991
Congregation Beit Tikva is a spiritual harmonious congregation sharing Jewish values in the reform tradition. We teach and practice Judaism seeking joy and commitment through education, mitzvot, tzedakah and ahavat yisrael. We are respectful of diverse opinions and are welcoming to all.
Santuario de Guadalupe

Santuario de Guadalupe

Built in 1781 west of the Santa Fe Plaza, the historic Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe church is now an art and history museum. The Santuario contains the Archdiocese of Santa Fe's collection of New Mexican santos (carved images of the saints), Italian Renaissance paintings, and Mexican baroque paintings. Among the treasured works is Our Lady of Guadalupe, one of the largest and finest oil paints of the Spanish Southwest, dated 1783 and signed by Jose de Alzibar, one of Mexico's most renowned painters.

Santuario de Guadalupe

100 N. Guadlupe
Santa Fe, NM 87501
505-983-8868
Built in 1781 west of the Santa Fe Plaza, the historic Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe church is now an art and history museum. The Santuario contains the Archdiocese of Santa Fe's collection of New Mexican santos (carved images of the saints), Italian Renaissance paintings, and Mexican baroque paintings. Among the treasured works is Our Lady of Guadalupe, one of the largest and finest oil paints of the Spanish Southwest, dated 1783 and signed by Jose de Alzibar, one of Mexico's most renowned painters.
First Presbyterian Church
The First Presbyterian Church of Santa Fe was founded in 1867, it was the only protestant church in the territory of New Mexico. The present church building, designed by architect John Gaw Meem in 1937, has been refurbished and restored and along with regular church services hosts many events for the performing arts community.
208 Grant Ave
Santa Fe, NM 87501
5059828544
The First Presbyterian Church of Santa Fe was founded in 1867, it was the only protestant church in the territory of New Mexico. The present church building, designed by architect John Gaw Meem in 1937, has been refurbished and restored and along with regular church services hosts many events for the performing arts community.
Unitarian Universalist Santa Fe
UU Santa Fe is a Welcoming Congregation and we hope you will join us on a Sunday. Sunday services at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. Nursery care is offered at the 10:30 service. Children and youth: 1st-3rd Sundays children start in the 10:30 am service and then go to class; 2nd-4th-5th Sunday, children stay in the sanctuary for the duration of the service. Please come!
107 West Barcelona
Santa Fe, NM 87502
505-982-9674
UU Santa Fe is a Welcoming Congregation and we hope you will join us on a Sunday. Sunday services at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. Nursery care is offered at the 10:30 service. Children and youth: 1st-3rd Sundays children start in the 10:30 am service and then go to class; 2nd-4th-5th Sunday, children stay in the sanctuary for the duration of the service. Please come!
Center For Inner Truth
Center For Inner Truth is a spiritual school and alternative church dedicated to the continual growth and evolvement of the human spirit. We believe that every individual, by Divine Right, can be in touch with their Intuition (psychic abilities) and that these abilities are natural, fun, and a very real part of being human. To that end we offer classes in meditation and mindfulness, workshops and healing events. We also offer spiritual counseling and frequent drop-in healing clinics. Call for a professional reading or officiant for your personalized ceremony.
1807 2nd Street, #84
Santa Fe, NM 87505
505-920-4418
Center For Inner Truth is a spiritual school and alternative church dedicated to the continual growth and evolvement of the human spirit. We believe that every individual, by Divine Right, can be in touch with their Intuition (psychic abilities) and that these abilities are natural, fun, and a very real part of being human. To that end we offer classes in meditation and mindfulness, workshops and healing events. We also offer spiritual counseling and frequent drop-in healing clinics. Call for a professional reading or officiant for your personalized ceremony.


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